Personal Projects

In pursuit of my art, I maintain a number of ongoing personal projects. The projects help me continue my journey as an artist while I am running my portrait photography business. While my art informs my day-to-day work, I have found that creating for other people is not, in itself, art. Creative personal projects give me balance which allows me to continue to exercise that creative brain, let out all the weird and funky and quirky. My creative development always trickles into my client work and sometimes winds up in the final product.

 
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Light Entwined

Light Entwined is an ongoing project of visual and literary call and response. Images are created, separately, by three photographers, and a poet writes a reply to what is seen. The photographers then create images in reply to the call of the poet. And so it goes.

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100 Days of Ten

In 2015 I began participating in the 100 Day Project sponsored by The Great Discontent magazine and Elle Luna. In my work as a photographer I felt like I saw so much sameness, I felt agitated and bored. I used the project as a way to shake myself out of my comfort zone and stretch my own creativity. At it’s completion, I was driven to invite other people to embrace similar projects. After observing so many people start projects only to quit within a few weeks, I hypothesized that one reason is that they choose a task that is difficult to maintain for 100 consecutive days. I began 100 Days of Ten, to encourage people to choose projects that took no longer than 10 minutes per day to accomplish.

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fine art 

Some of my projects have become fine art pieces for gallery exhibition. Check them out

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100 days of double exposure

Digging deep into the process of in-camera double-exposure photography.

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100 days of DISCONSTRUCTION

100 Days of “doing something” with about 10 years of photos of demolitions, many shot on film.